Frequently asked questions

WHAT IS THE FIRST THING I NEED TO DO WHEN SOMEONE PASSES AWAY?

Contact the person’s doctor. A doctor must certify that death has occurred. If the family wish to have a Cremation service the doctor must complete a death certificate as well as a form 7. (The doctor will be familiar with a form 7) This will help to speed up the process. The Funeral Director can then take the deceased into their care.

If your loved one has passed away at a hospital or nursing home then usually a Death certificate would have been organised through the hospital or care facility. Always make sure that the correct name and details of the deceased is given to the doctor as these forms must be completed accurately before a funeral service can be organised. (It is often a good idea to use a Drivers licence, Healthcare or Pension card.)

WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR ARRANGING A FUNERAL?

In most cases, the next of kin is responsible for arranging the funeral of the deceased, for example: spouse, child, parent, legal partner or sibling.

WHICH IS MORE POPULAR – BURIAL OR CREMATION?

The number of people in Australia choosing to be cremated is steadily increasing. Almost 70% of people now get cremated and this figure is constantly rising. A cremation service is substantially more affordable than a burial service and because of this a Cremation service is growing in popularity.

WHAT IS EMBALMING AND WHEN IS IT REQUIRED?

Essentially, Embalming is the process of replacing bodily fluids with chemical fluids for the purposes of: preservation of the body, infection control, and to enhance the presentation of the deceased. Some funeral companies insist on embalming the body but please bear in mind that it will come at a cost of $500 -$700.

IS A VIEWING OF THE DECEASED NECESSARY?

A viewing gives loved ones the opportunity to see and spend time with the deceased prior to the funeral. A viewing is not mandatory, if a family member feels as if they cannot identify the body then a Funeral director who has been given consent by the family can undertake this duty on the families’ behalf

WHAT ARE THE ASHES?

After the cremation process only the heavy bones of the deceased are left. They are granulated to provide the “Ashes”

HOW WILL I RECEIVE THE ASHES?

The ashes will be received in a Blue plastic container which has been issued by the Cemetery. We also have a large range of Urns which can be purchased from us from as little as $120.

DOES THE FUNERAL HOME CREMATE THE BODY?

No, in the state of Western Australia only a Government run organisation such as the Metropolitan Cemeteries Board has the right to cremate a body. In other states of Australia there are private crematorium which are allowed to cremate the body bit this law does not apply in Western Australia.

WHEN DOES A CREMATION TAKE PLACE?

In most cases a body will be cremated within a 24 hour period of the funeral service taking place.

CAN THE FAMILY VIEW A CREMATION?

Yes family members can view a cremation, but only at a certain time of the day and not at all cemeteries.

WHEN WILL THE ASHES BE AVAILABLE FOR COLLECTION?

Generally, the ashes will be available for collection within 48hrs of the funeral serviced taking place.

CAN I HAVE A RELIGIOUS SERVICE WITH A CREMATION?

Absolutely, if you would prefer to have a religious service whether it be at a Church or another place of worship this can be arranged for you.

What is the difference between a Funeral Celebrant and a Minister?

A Minister will generally have a service which relates to religion where as a Celebrant will generally conduct a service closer to the families wishes and generally without a religious influence.

 WHERE CAN A SERVICE TAKE PLACE?

A service can take place at a Church, Cemetery, and our Funeral Home or with shire approval outdoors in a place of your choice.

HOW CAN I BE SURE I HAVE THE RIGHT CREMATION ASHES?

An Identification lead plaque will accompany the body through the entire process. This ensures that no identification errors can occur.